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Thu, 09/21/2017 02:45 PM Injured construction worker  33.0  Lenoir County NC 
 USA 
  building     Outside,Work 
LENOIR COUNTY, NC (WITN) - A construction worker was severely injured after he was struck by lightning this afternoon as storms moved through Eastern Carolina. Lenoir County Emergency Management Director Roger Dail says it happened around 2:45 p.m. on Highway 55, just west of Jackson Store. Dail said emergency crews were able to get a pulse back on the man, who is around 33-years-old. He was taken to Vidant Medical Center, but his condition is not known at this time. Dail says the man was working to construct a livestock building on the farm property when he was hit. He said a language barrier initially hampered their efforts in getting information about what happened. So far this year there have been two lightning deaths in the state, including a Marine at the New River Air Station in Jacksonville.
Tue, 09/05/2017 11:00 AM Injured employee  0.0  Somerset KY 
 USA 
  walking across parking lot   N/A  Ground Strike,Outside,Park,Parking Lot,Umbrella,Work 
An employee of the Alton Blakley vehicle dealership was injured in a lightning strike Tuesday morning while walking across the lot. The employee, who is not being named at this time, was transported by Somerset-Pulaski County EMS to Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital before being transported to a Lexington hospital, as confirmed by Alton Blakley Dealership Vice President Paul Hoffman. No further details on the manâ¬"s condition were available at press time. Hoffman said that just before 11 a.m. ⬠just after the main part of a thunderstorm had moved through the area ⬠the employee was walking from one vehicle lot to another while holding an umbrella. It appears that lightning struck the umbrella. SOMERSET, Ky (LEX 18)-- Somerset first responders say an employee at Alton Blakley Ford was struck by lightning around 11:00 Tuesday morning. Out of respect for the victim's family, his name hasn't been released yet. David Guffey, a manager at the Alton Blakley dealership, says he saw the lightning touch ground on the car lot, then saw the employee lying on the ground. "We heard a loud boom, sounded like a transformer being hit, a couple people witnessed it and rushed to his aid, called 911, EMS showed up very quickly, was able to get him to a local hospital," Guffey told LEX 18. Somerset EMS says they took the lightning strike victim to Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital and then quickly transported him to UK Hospital. Guffey says it was surreal to witness what happened to one of his employees and friend. "He wasn't responsive. He was breathing. He did look bad, but I believe that was more for the fall, just hitting his head on the ground once he got struck," Guffey stated. "It was rough for myself as well as everybody here to witness." Regarding the victim's condition, Guffey says he's been in contact with the victim's wife, and reports he's doing better at UK Hospital. "The way she talked, it sounded better than we had thought just because it's such a traumatic experience."
Mon, 09/04/2017 12:00 PM Injured Christopher Lovera, 1 of 3  0.0  Sequoia National Park CA 
 USA 
  under tree    Camping,Ground Strike,Outside,Park,Tree 
A California father and his two young children have lived to tell the tale after they were all struck by lightning during a backpacking trip. Chris Lovera, 12-year-old Aidan and nine-year-old Nadia were at Jennie Lake in the Sequoia National Forest on September 5 huddling under a tree as a storm swept through. Lovera, 51, from Pacific Grove, had just started recording on his video camera when a bolt of lightning suddenly came down. Scroll down for video Chris Lovera and his two kids have lived to tell the tale aftet they were struck by lightning in the Sequoia National Forest. Lovera (pictured) suffered first- and second-degree burns on sections of his upper right back, arm pit and down his right arm +11 Chris Lovera and his two kids have lived to tell the tale aftet they were struck by lightning in the Sequoia National Forest. Lovera (pictured) suffered first- and second-degree burns on sections of his upper right back, arm pit and down his right arm Aidan (pictured) has suffered partial hearing loss after his ear drum was blown out. +11 Nadia (in bed) came out the best physically, with burns on the back of her right arm and on her upper thighs +11 Aidan, 12 (left), has suffered partial hearing loss after his ear drum was blown out. Nadia, nine (right), came out the best physically, with burns on the back of her right arm and on her upper thighs A hiker several hundred feet away captured the moment that the family was struck by the lightning that also set a tree on fire (pictured) +11 A hiker several hundred feet away captured the moment that the family was struck by the lightning that also set a tree on fire (pictured) Video playing bottom right... Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%0:00 Pause Unmute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:38 Fullscreen ExpandClose Lovera (pictured) was paralyzed for a few hours after the strike and is suffering from partial hearing loss +11 Lovera (pictured) was paralyzed for a few hours after the strike and is suffering from partial hearing loss The family, from Pacific Grove, California, was huddling under a tree as the storm was passing through +11 The family, from Pacific Grove, California, was huddling under a tree as the storm was passing through The bolt of electricity hit the tree before striking the father and kids, knocking them all unconscious. 'After that point it was each of us waking up to a different scene,' Lovera told CBS San Francisco. Aidan and Nadia awoke first, but their father was still knocked out. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next LA residents spot 'extraterrestrial' flashes in the sky... Terrifying video shows the moment an airport worker... SHARE THIS ARTICLE Share 'I thought he was dead 'cause I was just screaming at him and I couldn't see him breathing or moving,' Aiden said. It was enough to paralyze Lovera for a few hours, burning his clothes and even fusing them to parts of his body. Lovera suffered first- and second-degree burns on sections of his upper right back, arm pit and down his right arm with the burns resembling the fractal pattern of a lightning strike. Lovera, (pictured), had just started recording on his video camera when a sudden bolt of lightning came down +11 Lovera, (pictured), had just started recording on his video camera when a sudden bolt of lightning came down A rescue helicopter flew them out. Lovera (pictured) said that one of the rescuers, Nick Barton, who witnessed the event, told him it looked as if the family had been 'blown up' +11 A rescue helicopter flew them out. Lovera (pictured) said that one of the rescuers, Nick Barton, who witnessed the event, told him it looked as if the family had been 'blown up' Lovera said the strike burned through a great deal of his clothing (pictured) and even fused parts of it to his body +11 Lovera said the strike burned through a great deal of his clothing (pictured) and even fused parts of it to his body A rescue helicopter flew them out. Lovera said that one of the rescuers, Nick Barton, who witnessed the event, told him it looked as if the family had been 'blown up'. Their burns were healing but Aidan and his dad were still suffering from hearing loss after rupturing their ear drums. Nadia came out the best physically, with burns on the back of her right arm and on her upper thighs, although she also suffered partial paralysis. Of the three, Chris suffered the worst of the injuries. Dad shares moments before and after family gets hit my lightening Progress: 0%0:00 Previous Play Skip Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 1:33 Fullscreen Need Text Both of Lovera's kids (from left to right: Aidan, Lovera and Nadia) are now back in school, although both are dealing with the added challenges of balancing work and recovery +11 Both of Lovera's kids (from left to right: Aidan, Lovera and Nadia) are now back in school, although both are dealing with the added challenges of balancing work and recovery Although Lovera (center with Aidan, left, and Nadia, right) hopes to return to work soon, he says he is grateful that he and his family were able to walk away from the incident alive. He even now wears a 'Lucky Strike' shirt in honor of the event +11 Although Lovera (center with Aidan, left, and Nadia, right) hopes to return to work soon, he says he is grateful that he and his family were able to walk away from the incident alive. He even now wears a 'Lucky Strike' shirt in honor of the event Both of Lovera's kids are now back in school, although both are dealing with the added challenges of balancing work and recovery. Although he hopes to return to work soon, he says he is grateful that he and his family were able to walk away from the incident alive. He even now wears a 'Lucky Strike' shirt in honor of the event. 'Really, what I come away with is just the gratitude I have for this set of people who were so selfless and willing to go out in this storm  it was still lightning and raining, and they went out into this and helped us selflessly,' Lovera told The Mercury News. 'And it's just been overwhelming in a good way to see so many people in our community be willing to give. People are innately good at heart.' ADVERTISING Read more: Monterey County family recovering from being struck by lightning Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4906528/Father-kids-struck-lightning-hiking-trip.html#ixzz4tLiyKsJO Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
Mon, 08/28/2017 04:26 PM Injured 1 of 2   0.0  Des Plaines IL 
 USA 
  walking to car    Ground Strike,Outside,Parking Lot,Walking to Vehicle 
One man and one woman were treated for minor injuries Monday after being knocked off their feet by a bolt of lighting in Des Plaines. Fire Chief Alan Wax said the two individuals were not directly struck, but were a few feet away when the lightning touched down. At the time, they were walking together toward their car. The Abington 300x250 - Mobile & In Story An ambulance was dispatched to the 200 block of Howard Avenue at 4:26 p.m., with another arriving approximately 10 minutes later. Both victims were transported to Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge. All Des Plaines Fire Dept. crews had left the scene by 5:06 p.m., Wax said.
Sat, 08/26/2017 03:45 PM Killed Taylor Harsh, 1 of 6  24.0  Gulf Shores AL 
 USA 
  on beach  N/A  Beach,Critical,Direct hit,Outside 
Six friends were struck by lightning on the beach in Gulf Shores Saturday, leaving one of them severely injured. Taylor Harsh, a 24-year-old graduate of Mountain Brook High School and the University of Alabama, is listed in critical condition at UAB Hospital's Trauma and Burn Intensive Care Unit, according to a hospital spokeswoman. A second young man, Stephen Clark, was hospitalized at South Baldwin Regional Medical Center with injuries described by authorities as serious, but he is expected to be OK. He also was transferred to UAB where he remained on Sunday. "It just happened really fast,' said Oliver Brown, who was one of the young men knocked down by the strike. Gulf Shores Fire Department Battalion Chief Bo Smith said authorities responded about 3:45 p.m. Saturday to a beach house on West Beach Boulevard. Harsh and five other young men were on the beach when all six were impated by a lightning bolt. All six of the young men were knocked unconscious, Smith said, however family of one of the men said all were knocked down but not all were unconscious. Brown said there was a slight rain but they had not seen any lightning nor heard any thunder. They were packing up to go inside when tragedy hit. "There was a really bright flash of light out of nowhere,' he said. "It hit Taylor and then arced to Stephen and then one other guy." "After that, it was over. I was a little dazed,' he said. "I didn't really know what was going on." Another man, he said, was nearby and saw it all happen. "He said all of us were up, and then all of us were down,' Brown said. "I remember thinking there's lightning close, and then I was on the ground." Harsh stayed unconscious and his friends started life-saving measures. When rescue workers arrived on the scene, the CPR was in progress, fire officials said. Several other friends were inside the house and saw the incident happened and rushed to help their friends, he said. Harsh, the son of a Birmingham physician, and the other young man were rushed to South Baldwin. Harsh was then flown to UAB Hospital early Sunday, and Clark also was transferred. Initially, Clark was only able to move his head and his right arm. Brown said he's now recovering well. Smith said the weather on the beach was overcast at the time, and a strong storm cell moved in to the area quickly and unexpectedly. "The lightning was horrible,' he said. "The suddenness is what really shocked me,' Brown said. "It came out of nowhere.' GULF SHORES, Alabama (WKRG)  A man was fatally struck by lightning on West Beach in Gulf Shores on Saturday. News 5 is told 24-year-old Taylor Harsh of Mountain Brook was killed after being struck directly by the lightning bolt. Saturdays radar shows the storm as it formed north of the Gulf and began moving south. A lightning bolt struck and struck all 6 of them, says Gulf Shores Fire Chief Hartley Brokenshaw. Carol Cordon witnessed the aftermath, So sad, young boys hands on their heads, they were all on their cell phones they were distraught. It was a really sad situation. Beaches can be deadly during a storm filled with lightning. A lot of times you see lightning in the distance but theres sunshine over you so, you think, oh well maybe its moving that way or maybe its moving that way so you kind of take your chance but its not worth it. Some witnesses dispute whether the group in town for a bachelor party did what they should as the storm approached. Regardless, Chief Brokenshaw says the results are devastating and plans to put more emphasis on lightning safety. They were down here to have a good time. They werent doing anything wrong. Everything was going good and this happens and it hurts me. Five others were affected and one remains in serious condition. They are all from the Birmingham area.
Thu, 08/24/2017 01:00 PM Injured Keith Potts  45.0  Iredell NC 
 USA 
  mowing lawn    Ground Strike,Outside,Tree,Yard 
A bolt of lightning zapped a tree in the backyard of a home on Hoke Lane, off Mock Mill Road in western Iredell. Keith Potts was mowing the grass underneath the tree at the time and was also hit. SHAWN TAYLOR/STATESVILLE RECORD & LANDMARK Family members say an Iredell man is lucky to be alive after he was struck by lightning on Wednesday while doing yard work. Keith Potts, 54, was knocked off his feet when the bolt of electricity zapped a tree in the backyard of a home on Hoke Lane, off Mock Mill Road in western Iredell. Potts was mowing the grass underneath the tree at the time and was also hit. He was transported by Iredell EMS to Iredell Memorial Hospital in stable condition. Family members say he was not unconscious and was expected to be released the same day after doctors tested his heart for damage. â¬SMan, he dodged a bullet,⬝ Lloyd Potts, the manâ¬"s son, said, while looking at the tree that was struck. The tree had a stripe down its trunk where the bark had been blasted off and parts of it were singed black. A thunderstorm rolled over Iredell shortly after 1 p.m. Lloyd Potts said the storm â¬Scame out of nowhere.⬝
Thu, 08/24/2017 Injured Mathias Steinhuber  31.0  Tinker Knob CA 
 USA 
  hiking    Ground Strike,Hiking,Outside 
An Austrian teacher hiking the Pacific Crest Trail had just raised his arms for a picture. BY OLGA R. RODRIGUEZ AND JONATHAN J. COOPERASSOCIATED PRESS Share facebook tweet email print Comment Comment SACRAMENTO, Calif.  There was no rain, no rumbling, no sign of danger before the blinding flash and deafening bang of a lightning bolt threw Mathias Steinhuber to the ground, tore off his clothes and burned a gaping hole in his shoe. The 31-year-old Austrian teacher, an avid hiker, had just reached the 9,000-foot summit of a Northern California mountain range ahead of his companions when he raised his arms for a picture and was struck in the back of the head. The electricity shot through his body and exited through his foot, and he was too stunned to know what had happened. Mathias Steinhuber of Innsbruck, Austria, who survived being struck by a lighting bolt, pauses while discussing the near-fatal event Thursday in Sacramento, Calif. Associated Press/Rich Pedroncelli It was like in a dream, Steinhuber told The Associated Press Thursday. I woke up. I had blood everywhere. My clothes were ripped apart. At some distance I heard my girlfriend scream my name. My first conclusion was that I probably fell down the mountain. He crawled to a ledge and saw his girlfriend and their friend below and wondered, if hed fallen off a cliff, why was he still above them? Thats when he heard the girlfriend, Kathrin Klausner, scream that he was struck by lightning. Steinhuber had cuts and bruises from his fall and a number of burns he described as mostly superficial. The hair on one of his arms was singed when he spoke to the AP at the University of California, Davis Hospital Burn Center in Sacramento. Hes struggling to hear through his left ear. He and Klausner, who are from Innsbruck, Austria, were hiking a stretch of the long Pacific Crest Trail as they neared the end of a nearly four-week trip to the United States. He hurried ahead, looking to get an extra workout as he climbed to the top of Tinker Knob, a bare peak near Lake Tahoe with sweeping views of the surrounding Sierra Nevada peaks and forests below. Some of the wounds Mathias Steinhuber received from being struck by a lighting bolt are seen on his right foot. His left foot, where the lightning exited his body, is wrapped. Associated Press/Rich Pedroncelli The trio was hiking from Donner Summit to Squaw Valley, a short section of the rugged, 2,650-mile Pacific Crest Trail that runs from Mexico to Canada and challenges experienced hikers from all over the world. Steinhuber doesnt remember being struck, only the aftermath, and drifting in and out of consciousness until help arrived. He was taking a picture and the next thing I know, I see this white flash, like an explosion, the couples friend, Cara Elvidge, told The Associated Press in a phone interview from Fairfield, California. Elvidge and Klausner took shelter and called for help, not knowing if hed survived. Authorities told the women not to climb up to help, lest they put themselves in danger. A helicopter landed on Tinker Knob, elevation 8,949 feet, and dropped off a paramedic who tended to Steinhuber. He was taken to a hospital in nearby Truckee then flown to the burn center in Sacramento, where he was listed in fair condition late Thursday. Meanwhile, Elvidge and Klausner had to hike out for six long hours without knowing whether Steinhuber would survive or endure debilitating injuries, Klausner said. I cannot tell you how thankful I am for just being here, for him to be alive, Klausner said. Seeing him like this is a miracle, and Im thankful every day for this. The couple was supposed to return to Innsbruck on Thursday, but they spent the day in the hospital. Theyre eager to go home but unsure when Steinhuber will be well enough for the lengthy plane ride, he said. Somebody told me the odds are higher winning the lottery than getting struck by lightning, Steinhuber said. I wouldve rather won the lottery. 'I would've rather won the lottery': Hiker, 31, jokes about odds after he was struck in the HEAD by lightning while taking a photo in California mountains and left covered in blood Mathias Steinhuber was visiting California from Austria He and his girlfriend were hiking in the Tahoe area with a friend in Truckee, California At the top of a point called Tinkers Knob, Steinhuber was struck by lightning while taking a photo on his phone The lightning strike blasted away his clothes and burned a hole in one of his shoes He said: 'Somebody told me the odds are higher winning the lottery than getting struck by lightning, I would've rather won the lottery' By Mollie Cahillane and Megan Sheets For Dailymail.com PUBLISHED: 10:55 EDT, 25 August 2017 | UPDATED: 16:58 EDT, 25 August 2017 e-mail 10 shares 10 View comments An Austrian man hiking 9,000 feet up in the Sierra Nevada was on a peak taking a photo on Tuesday when he was struck by a lightning bolt that blasted away his clothes, burned a hole in one of his shoes and left him with severe burns. Mathias Steinhuber, 31, was hiking the Pacific Crest Trail with his girlfriend and their friend had an entry wound on his head and an exit wound on his foot from the lightning. His phone and the picture he was taking survived. The photograph has a bright orange and white stripe on it. An Austrian man took this photo the moment he was struck by lightning while hiking in Northern California. The lightning hit him in the head and exited through his foot +8 An Austrian man took this photo the moment he was struck by lightning while hiking in Northern California. The lightning hit him in the head and exited through his foot 'Somebody told me the odds are higher winning the lottery than getting struck by lightning,' Steinhuber said from the University of California, Davis Hospital Burn Center. 'I would've rather won the lottery.' Steinhuber was struck the day before a Massachusetts woman won $758.7 million in the Powerball jackpot. 'It was like in a dream,' he said. 'I woke up. I had blood everywhere, my clothes were ripped apart. At some distance I heard my girlfriend scream my name. My first conclusion was that I probably fell down the mountain.' The couple from Innsbruck, Austria was visiting a friend, Carla Elvidge, in Truckee, California, near Lake Tahoe. Elvidge said she, Steinhuber and his girlfriend, Kathrin Klausner, were hiking from Donner Summit to Squaw Valley and that all are avid hikers. Some of the wounds Mathias Steinhuber received from being struck by a lighting bolt are seen on his right foot. His left foot, where the lightning exited his body, is wrapped +8 Some of the wounds Mathias Steinhuber received from being struck by a lighting bolt are seen on his right foot. His left foot, where the lightning exited his body, is wrapped He was taken by helicopter to the the Tahoe Forest Hospital in Truckee, before being flown to the University of California, Davis Hospital Burn Center where he is listed in fair condition. He said he received the wound near his eye from falling on rocks after the lighting strike +8 He was taken by helicopter to the the Tahoe Forest Hospital in Truckee, before being flown to the University of California, Davis Hospital Burn Center where he is listed in fair condition. He said he received the wound near his eye from falling on rocks after the lighting strike The strike blasted the clothes off his body, including his underwear  +8 The strike blasted the clothes off his body, including his underwear Steinhuber feels extraordinarily lucky that he survived being struck by lightning  +8 Steinhuber feels extraordinarily lucky that he survived being struck by lightning Steinhuber was hiking ahead of his friends and had reached the top of Tinkers Knob, a bare peak with sweeping views of the surrounding mountains and the forests below. 'He was taking a picture and the next thing I know, I see this white flash, like an explosion,' Elvidge said. Steinhuber was thrown away and his shoes and all his clothes, including his underwear, were ripped off from his body. The lightning bolt singed his clothes and burned a gaping hole through one of his tennis shoes. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Revealed: Student, 20, who suddenly started vomiting while... British hiker, 57, dies after collapsing at famous Hell's... SHARE THIS ARTICLE Share A second lightning bolt struck next to Klausner, who felt the electricity in her body, and the two decided to take shelter and call for help, Elvidge said. A helicopter landed on Tinker Knob, which is at an elevation of 8,949 feet, and dropped off a paramedic who tended to Steinhuber. He was taken to Tahoe Forest Hospital in Truckee and then flown to the University of California, Davis Hospital Burn Center, where he was listed in fair condition on Thursday. Elvidge and Klausner hiked out, uncertain whether Steinhuber would survive or endure debilitating injuries, Klausner said. Steinhuber and Klausner said they feel extraordinarily lucky that he survived and are grateful for the quick response from rescuers. A video posted to Facebook by the California Highway Patrol Valley Air Operations unit shows Steinhuber's clothes that have holes burned in them +8 A video posted to Facebook by the California Highway Patrol Valley Air Operations unit shows Steinhuber's clothes that have holes burned in them The hiker's singed shoes are shown above. The photo was taken from the CHPVAO video +8 The hiker's singed shoes are shown above. The photo was taken from the CHPVAO video The CHPVAO included helicopter footage in the Facebook post about the incident +8 The CHPVAO included helicopter footage in the Facebook post about the incident Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4823346/Hiker-struck-lightning-woke-blood-everywhere.html#ixzz4qrTc5eWH Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
Fri, 08/18/2017 11:00 AM Injured Frank Sink  75.0  Clearwater FL 
 USA 
  on golf course    Golf Course,Ground Strike,Outside 
CLEARWATER (FOX 13) - A round of golf at a Clearwater golf course took a frightening turn Friday when a bolt of lightning struck nearby, knocking a golfer unconscious. Frank Sink, 75, was golfing in a foursome that included his friend, 84-year-old Walter Staats. They were approaching the green of the fourth hole at the Clearwater Country Club when lightning struck. "It was just rainy, just overcast and rainy. We hadn't had any sign of lightning or we hadn't heard any thunder," Staats recalled later Friday. Seemingly out of nowhere, at about 11 a.m., a thunderstorm built up overhead. "That big boom hit," Staats said. "We looked at each other and said, 'we're out of here.' And we turned around and there's Frank laying on his back. I didn't see him get hit. I didn't see him fall. But just, he was laying on his back on the cart trail." Staats said Sink didn't appear to be breathing and was turning blue. One of their other golfing partners ran over and performed CPR until paramedics arrived. "He did a fine job, he kept him alive," Staats told FOX 13, adding the situation was very scary. "You feel like running, taking off running but you don't have any place to go." Sink was in critical condition for a couple of hours at Tampa General Hospital but, by late in the afternoon, his condition had been upgraded to fair. Staats said he golfs with Sink three times a week and hopes he can get back on the course with him again soon. In the meantime, he's relieved more golfers weren't hurt. "It could have happened to all of us, any of us, all three of us, if we had been together all in a bunch," he said.
Wed, 08/16/2017 12:00 PM Injured Donald & Margaret Korstad  0.0  Granite Falls MN 
 USA 
  in a car    In a car,Indirect 
All Donald Korstad wanted to do was go to Menards. But as he and his wife, Margaret, were driving their GMC Envoy to Willmar on Sunday, August 13, something unexpected happened - they were struck by lightning. The event happened while the couple was taking Highway 23 to Willmar. I had noticed that my hair was standing up, said Margaret Korstad afterwards. And then, without warning, the whole car was filled with a bright white light, which was quickly followed by a bang. It sounded like somebody was shooting a shotgun inside our car, added Korstad afterwards. In fact, the car had just been struck by a bolt of lightning, which entered through the antenna (which was almost completely destroyed). According to testimony from witnesses, a plume of black smoke was expelled from beneath the vehicle. Inside the car, the airbags automatically deployed. After pulling over and getting out, the couple noticed that both front and back tires on the drivers side were blown out. The couple feels incredibly lucky to escape the freak accident unscathed. While rubber tires provide some protection (and make lightning strikes uncommon), vehicles are not impermeable to lightning. The couple hopes that their experience will serve as a cautionary tale to others driving close to lightning.
Wed, 08/16/2017 12:00 PM Injured Tesia Swearingen   0.0  Hall County GA 
 USA 
  in kitchen with door open    Indirect,Indoors 
HALL COUNTY, Ga. - A woman says she is a walking miracle after she was hit by lightning while cooking in her kitchen. Tesia Swearingen said she was cooking as a thunderstorm rolled through Monday. She said she made the mistake of opening the door to hear the storm. We always have the doors open. We love listening to the thunderstorms, Swearingen said. The woman said suddenly everything turned white. TRENDING STORIES: There are 32 active hate groups in Georgia, report says Heres the exact timing of when youll see the eclipse in your city Man livestreamed during SWAT standoff, police say I felt this jolt of electricity come out the tips of my fingers and there was a loud pop and spark, she said. I was very dizzy and lightheaded and, yeah, I was electrocuted. Swearingen drove herself to North Georgia Medical Center, where she went through a series of tests, X-rays and blood work. I dont have any burns or anything like that from where the lightning came out. Im fine, she said. The woman said shes learned her lesson. Theres not a lot of people who can make it out completely unharmed and be able to tell their story because that was a lot of electricity, Swearingen said. She said from now on when Severe Weather Team 2 meteorologist Glenn Burns says to be weather aware, she will listen.
Tue, 08/15/2017 03:00 PM Injured man  31.0  Homestead FL 
 USA 
      Outside 
A man was struck by lightning in Homestead Monday afternoon, Miami-Dade Fire Rescue said. Emergency crews responded to the scene on Southwest 272nd Street and 224th Avenue around 3 p.m. Officials said a 31-year-old man was transported to Homestead Hospital after he was struck by the lightning bolt. His condition is unknown. No other information was available. Source: Man Struck by Lightning in Homestead - NBC 6 South Florida http://www.struckbylightning.org/news/sbl20172508095305_Fire-Rescue-Responds-to-Report-of-Man-Struck-by-Lightning-in-Homestead-440364723.html.htm#ixzz4qm7BTqLa Follow us: @nbcmiami on Twitter | NBCMiami on Facebook
Sun, 08/13/2017 12:00 AM Killed John Daniel Huisjen  24.0  Telluride CO 
 USA 
  Biking    Bicycle,Outside,Taking Shelter 
A 24-year-old Durango man was struck and killed by lightning Sunday while mountain biking near Telluride, according to the San Miguel Sheriffs Office. The Sheriffs Office identified the man as John Daniel Huisjen. Next of kin have been notified, authorities said. According to a news release, Huisjen was mountain biking with his girlfriend on the East Fork Trail near the Lizard Head Wilderness, about 17 miles south of Telluride, when a lightning storm moved in just before noon. SPONSORED CONTENT [Video] Why Employees at This Company Are Encouraged to Volunteer BY EVERSOURCE Huisjen and his girlfriend, along with other groups of mountain bikers, sought shelter below tree line when Huisjen was struck. Huisjens girlfriend ran to get help, finding an off-duty Telluride EMT, who was also in the area mountain biking with a friend, about a 100 yards away. The EMT told the Sheriffs Office he ran to Huisjen, who was unresponsive, pulseless and breathless. The EMT started CPR and sent his friend to call 911 and track down an AED. Other bystanders also helped with CPR, but ultimately, efforts to revive Huisjen were unsuccessful. In a prepared statement, Sheriff Bill Masters thanks all those who responded and did everything they could for this young man. This is a horrible tragedy, Masters said. Our thoughts are with his family. Huisjens girlfriend was transported to a local hospital with non-life threatening injuries, the release said. According to his Facebook account, Huisjen studied at Fort Lewis College, and worked at the Environmental Center at Fort Lewis College, as well as the U.S. Forest Service as a forestry aid (fire). jromeo@durangoherald.com
Fri, 08/04/2017 12:00 PM Injured 3 of 3 sisters  8.0  Lily Lake UT 
 USA 
  at lake    Camping,Ground Strike,Near Water,Outside 
Fri, 08/04/2017 12:00 PM Injured 2 of 3 sisters  7.0  Lily Lake UT 
 USA 
  at lake  N/A  fishing,Ground Strike,Near Water,Outside,Water 
KUTV) Friday afternoon near Lily Lake in the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, three sisters are considered lucky to be alive after being struck by lightning. The Thompson family was out fishing when a fast-moving storm came through the area. The three young girls ages 2, 7, and 8 tried to escape the lightning by hiding under nearby trees, but tragedy still struck. The 2 older sisters ages 7 and 8 are currently in Salt Lake City hospitals in critical conditions. The younger sister age 2 is in fair condition after a lightning strike that could have killed them. Two of the girls had entrance wounds on their back from the lightning that then exited at their hips. The father of the girls performed CPR to revive his daughters after they had fallen unconscious. The sheriffs office says the father did everything he was supposed to in that situation. He managed to get his daughters away from the water as fast as possible and now is being called a hero. EVANSTON  A week after being struck by lightning, the Thompson sisters are back at home and recovering well. The girls father, Kyle Thompson, said the girls are all doing great now, although there are still some lingering effects from the lightning strike. In addition to the heroic efforts of others at the lake and medical personnel, one of the things Kyle Thompson stresses is how knowing CPR made the difference between life and death. If it wasnt for that, I would have just sat there and watched my kids die, he said. BraiLynn sustained a minor brain injury like a concussion and will need some speech therapy, and both BraiLynn, aged 7, and Peyton, aged 6, have some memory loss and severe burns. Zoey, the youngest, turned 4 years old just days after the lightning strike. She had the fewest injuries, with first degree burns on her legs and hips. Kyle Thompson said his family, which had moved to Evanston in February, was out at Lily Lake (about 30 miles from Evanston in the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest) on Friday, Aug. 4. Kyle and Janika Thompson were enjoying a day of fishing with their daughters, BraiLynn, Peyton, Zoey, and their 1-year-old son, Vayden. Kyle Thompson said he had just caught a fish and let it go after taking pictures of his kids, and he was casting out the line again when it started sprinkling. He got his family away from the water into the trees, and within two minutes, there was a downpour and they started packing up. Then lightning struck. I felt energy in the air and just all around me, and I knew it was a close strike, but I didnt know at the time that it hit my children, Kyle Thompson said, adding that he heard the strike before he saw it. However, Janika Thompson, holding Vayden, saw the strike out of the corner of her eye and started screaming. Kyle Thompson then remembers hearing Zoey crying and screaming and saw her trying to crawl away, just 15-20 feet away from Janika Thompson. BraiLynn and Peyton, though, were convulsing on the ground, eyes rolled back in their heads and not breathing. It was later determined that they had both been struck directly by the lightning. Peyton at first appeared to be in worse shape, Kyle Thompson said; she was smoking out of her head, and her clothes were ripped and split at the seams and even burning in several spots. Both Brailynns and Peytons boots had also been blown halfway off and were burned. Kyle Thompson didnt even hesitate to assess the situation, saying he didnt care about anything but helping his daughters. He started with four compressions on Peyton before she started breathing, then after he helped her into the recovery position, he went to help BraiLynn. Whether because of his nerves or her condition, he didnt feel a heartbeat, but he persisted in doing compressions and taking breaths for her. I [took] several minutes to get her going before she took her first breath on her own, he said. In the meantime, other people at the lake were jumping into action, trying to get cell phone service and help the distraught family. When the two LifeFlight helicopters arrived, Kyle Thompson said, he carried Peyton and another man carried BraiLynn. The two older girls were flown out to Primary Childrens Hospital in Salt Lake City while Zoey was taken to Evanston Regional Hospital by ambulance. The older girls were initially said to be in critical condition. All told, Kyle Thompson said, there were four days in the ICU, a day and a half in neurological ICU, two Life Flight helicopters landing at the scene and an ambulance. He said he is grateful to all the first responders and nurses and doctors who took care of his daughters, as well as to the community for prayers and support. To help with the medical expenses  Kyle Thompson said he is looking at probably $300,000 in medical bills, and his insurance probably wont cover a lot of it  two GoFundMe pages have been set up and there is a fund at U.S. Bank for the family. Although the monetary costs are high, Kyle Thompson is thankful that his daughters are recovering and doing well  and hopes that others will learn about the value of CPR from his experience. He said that everyone, not just parents, should be trained in it and pay attention in case it is needed someday. Im glad that I was trained in CPR, he said again. If I wasnt, I would have just sat there and watched my children die.
Fri, 08/04/2017 12:00 PM Injured 1 of 3 Thompson sisters  4.0  Lily Lake UT 
 USA 
  at lake  N/A  Camping,Ground Strike,Near Water,Outside,Water 
SALT LAKE CITY (AP)  Police say a lightning strike at mountain lake injured three sisters in eastern Utah, leaving two in critical condition. Authorities said the girls aged 2, 7 and 8 were at Lily Lake near the Wyoming border when they were struck Friday afternoon. Summit County Sheriffs Lt. Andrew Wright says the two older girls were flown to hospitals with critical injuries. The third was taken by ambulance in fair condition. Wright says the lake is one of hundreds in the Uinta Mountains used for camping, hiking and fishing. Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. EVANSTON  Three young sisters from Evanston were struck by lightning on Friday afternoon, leaving two critically injured. The three Thompson sisters, all under the age of 10, were with their parents on a camping and fishing trip at Lily Lake in the Uinta Mountains just south of the Wyoming border. According to law enforcement, the family has asked not to release their first names. The lake, about 32 miles or 45 minutes from Evanston, is a popular summer spot, and there were many other people there that day. Evanston Fire Captain Tim Overy said a fast-moving thunderstorm rolled in early Friday afternoon, prompting the girls father to direct his family away from the water to shelter under some small trees. From what we were told, the storm moved in at such a quick pace, and it was violent, very dramatic, said Summit County Sheriffs Lt. Andrew Wright. ... Witnesses that were up there described it as coming in [with] extremely violent lightning. He said that some witnesses knew the lightning struck ground and heard people screaming, but Wright was unsure whether the screams were directly related to the girls injuries. Dispatch received the 911 call around five minutes after the lightning strike. Spotty cell phone service may have delayed the call, which was made by someone not related to the family. In addition, the call was first routed to a Wyoming call center at 1:47 p.m. before being transferred to Summit County at 1:49 p.m. The first officer on the scene, Uinta County Sheriffs Deputy Calvin Robinson, said that it took him a little over 30 minutes to arrive. According to police scanner updates Friday afternoon, responders struggled to find the exact location as they headed through the rocky, winding roads on the mountain. Robinson said the paths in the area are basically rocky two-tracks, and although he got his truck through and the fire department used ATVs, other vehicles couldnt navigate the road. Considering the location, the remote area in the forest, ... I guess the response time was pretty good, actually, Wright said. Through the back-and-forth among dispatch, the caller and the responders, responders finally found the family on the south side of Lily Lake after using sirens to confirm they were en route. At one point, the dispatcher reported, the woman calling asked if she could start carrying one of the girls toward the approaching sirens. Responding vehicles included three ambulances (one from Summit County and two from Evanston) and two helicopters. In the meantime, the girls father immediately leapt into action to perform CPR on his two older daughters, aged 7 and 8, who had been knocked unconscious. According to the reports on the police scanner, one of the girls remained unconscious for most of the time responders were on their way, but Robinson said the father had managed to revive them by the time he got to the scene. When I arrived, the two older girls that were more injured were, I guess, semi-conscious, Robinson said. Their eyes were open, they were breathing, but not necessarily talking or interacting. Wright described the girls father as a hero. Summit County responders arrived shortly after the Uinta County responders, Wright said, as some were looking for a missing hiker just 20 miles away. Normally, Summit County responders would be located in Park City, Utah, about 60 miles away from Lily Lake. The two older girls were in critical condition and were Life Flighted to a Salt Lake area hospital as soon as the helicopters could land on a hastily constructed landing area, which Overy said was set up within 50 feet of the strike. Reports over the police scanner indicated that one of the girls was suffering from agonal breathing, which is typically associated with cardiogenic shock or cardiac arrest. Robinson said the older girls had welts or abrasions down their chests, and Wright said one of the responding Summit County deputies thought the lightning directly hit at least one of the girls. He describes her having marks that went through her back and came out her hip, Wright said, although he said, without direct medical confirmation, he is uncertain whether she was hit directly or if the strike was transferred through a tree. The youngest girl was doing much better than her sisters and was taken to Evanston Regional Hospital by ambulance for evaluation. Initial reports indicated that she is 2 years old, but Robinson said he found she is 4 years old after talking with her. Wright was unable to confirm the girls current condition, saying the medical centers in the area do not release that information because of HIPAA regulations. However, the girls are expected to live. At least two GoFundMe pages have been set up to benefit the family, and other fundraisers are in the works as well. I think the final thing that I would add is that we consider the father a hero in this situation, Wright said. ... Theres absolutely nothing that that father could have done different. He said the family was just enjoying time together on vacation, and it was simply a case of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Our hearts go out to them, Wright said. ... All of us that were involved in that day  its difficult for first responders to go to something like that when you have three victims, three young children. He again pointed to the father as doing everything he could  getting his children away from the water, trying to direct them to safety and rushing to action when his daughters were struck. When they were struck by lightning, [he] saved his childrens lives, Wright said, and we were able to get medical help to them as quick as we could. We consider the father a hero, and, again, our hearts and prayers go out to the family. The National Weather Service does have some tips about avoiding lightning strikes, but emphasizes that no place outside is safe when there are thunderstorms. The NWS advises getting to shelter, a substantial building with electricity or plumbing or an enclosed, metal-topped vehicle with windows up, and remaining there for at least 30 minutes after last hearing thunder. If caught outside in a thunderstorm, people should avoid open or elevated areas, water, isolated trees, objects that conduct electricity and rocky overhangs or cliffs. The NWS also advises never lying flat on the ground or gathering in groups.
Wed, 08/02/2017 12:00 PM Killed Richard Lutes  82.0  Brewster OH 
 USA 
  in a field    Field,Outside 
BREWSTER, Ohio Authorities are investigating whether an 82-year-old Ohio man found dead in a field behind his house was struck by lightning. The body of Richard Lutes, of Brewster, was found Wednesday afternoon by his wife. Authorities say Lutes was outside during a brief storm that rolled over Stark County in northeast Ohio. A coroners investigator says Lutes had a lesion on his chest that could have been caused by lightning. The Stark County Coroners Office is expected to determine the cause of Lutes death on Thursday. Brewster is about 15 miles southwest of Canton.
Tue, 08/01/2017 12:00 PM Injured 3 of 3   0.0  Indianapolis IN 
 USA 
  paving a parking lot    Ground Strike,Outside,Parking Lot,Work 
Tue, 08/01/2017 12:00 PM Injured 2 of 2   0.0  Indianapolis IN 
 USA 
  paving a parking lot    Ground Strike,Outside,Parking Lot,Work 
Tue, 08/01/2017 12:00 PM Injured 1 of 3  0.0  Indianapolis IN 
 USA 
  paving a parking lot    Ground Strike,Outside,Parking Lot,Work 
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) Indiana authorities say a school police officer and a rescue crew have revived a man after a lightning strike left him without a pulse. The fire chief says the man was among three contractors paving a parking lot who sought shelter from a storm under a tree Tuesday afternoon. When lightning struck it knocked all three men to the ground, and the one nearest the strike went into cardiac arrest. That's when the school officer began CPR and shocked him once with an external defibrillator. Then rescue crews shocked him twice more before they revived him.
Fri, 07/28/2017 05:25 PM Killed Lamar Rayfield, 1 of 2   35.0  Satellite Beach FL 
 USA 
  at beach  N/A  Beach,Outside,Park 
Lightning struck two men, killing one, iust north of Satellite Beach on Friday afternoon, according to the Brevard County Sheriff's Office and Brevard County Fire Rescue. Brevard County Lifeguard Captain Ashley Nolan was the first to respond to help the men. The men were hit at SPRA Park in the 400 block of State Road A1A at the end of Berkeley Street. "I was just heading home and you could see the lightning strikes and how close it was to the beach," Nolan said. "I see a gentleman darting directly out into traffic, waving for help. I knew instantly that someone had been struck." Nolan gave CPR to the man and checked his pulse until paramedics arrived. "I knew he had been down for less than a minute," she said. That man, whose name was not released Friday, died from his injuries at a hospital, Sheriff's Office spokesman Tod Goodyear announced at 7:45 p.m. The other person struck was being treated at a hospital Friday night, he said. Neither of the men were Brevard County residents, Goodyear said. Florida's rainy season, with its frequent afternoon storms, presents a lightning threat, particularly for beachgoers. "We try to warn people all the time and try to get people off the beach" when a storm is coming, Nolan said. Officials have identified the man who died after being struck by lightning just north of Satellite Beach. More: Man killed by lightning in Satellite Beach area The victim was Lamar Rayfield, 35, of Philadelphia, who was struck by lightning while walking along the beach with a group of people, according to Brevard County Sheriff's Office spokesman Tod Goodyear. Rayfield was pronounced dead after being transported to the hospital. A second man in the group also was struck by lightning. Goodyear said that man was "disoriented, but awake," after he was struck, and was hospitalized in stable condition. More: Bomb threat evacuates Searstown Mall in Titusville According to a National Weather Service database, Rayfield was the fifth person to die after being struck by lightning in Florida this year and the 11th nationwide. The Rayfield and the other man were hit shortly before 5:25 p.m. at S.P.R.A. Park, a neighborhood beach park located along the 400 block of State Road A1A at the end of Berkeley Street. Brevard County Ocean Rescue lifeguard captain Ashley Nolan was the first to respond to help the men. Nolan was heading home from work at the time of the lightning strike, when she pulled over in her car to provide medical assistance. She spoke afterward about the dangers of lightning along the beach. "We try to warn people all the time," Nolan said. "These Florida summers, we try to get people off the beach all the time ... because people don't take the lightning seriously, but it is so dangerous and so deadly. Lightning in Florida in the summertime is not something you want to mess with. It takes one second, and one strike, and unfortunately, that's what happened here today." Kevin Rodriguez, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Melbourne, said the storm associated with the fatality produced 60 to 65 cloud-to-ground strikes of lightning between 5 and 6 p.m. Friday in an area stretching from Rockledge to Melbourne Beach. Other victims of fatal lightning strikes in Florida this year include a 46-year-old man in Jensen Beach, a 35-year-old man in Baker, a 34-year-old man in Pembroke Pines and an infant boy in Fort Myers. The National Weather Service database lists the last fatal lightning strike in Brevard as having occurred in 2009 in Melbourne Beach. The victim was a 54-year-old man who was in the process of seeking shelter. Staff photographer Malcolm Denemark contributed to this report. Contact Berman at 321-242-3649 or dberman@floridatoday.com. Follow him on Twitter at @bydaveberman and on Facebook at facebook.com/dave.berman.54
Fri, 07/28/2017 12:00 PM Injured 2 of 2  0.0  Satellite Beach FL 
 USA 
  at beach    Beach,Ground Strike,Outside,Park 
Fri, 07/28/2017 12:30 AM Injured 2 o 2 girls  12.0  Beaver County UT 
 USA 
  on a hike    Camping,Direct hit,Hiking,Outside 
Fri, 07/28/2017 12:30 AM Injured 1 of 2 girls  16.0  Beaver County UT 
 USA 
  on a hike    Camping,Hiking,Indirect,Outside 
(KUTV) Two girls were struck by lightning in Beaver County, Utah Friday. One of them is in critical condition, after both were airlifted for medical care after a family dog led rescuers to the victims according to the Beaver County Sheriff's Office. A release from the sheriff's office said a dog, with the girls at the time of the strike, returned alone to their camp at a family reunion and led family back to where the girls were found unconscious on the ground. One of the girls is 16-years-old, the other is 8-years-old. The girls were on a hike in the area of Puffer Lake when lightning struck the 8-year-old on the top of her head and traveled into the older girl, according to Wende Wilding with Fishlake National Forest. Det. Kelly Davis of the Beaver County Sheriff's Department said the girls left their camp on an ATV to go hiking about 25 miles east of Beaver, Utah, in an area known as Big Flat. According to Davis, the girls left State Route 153, that runs across the mountain, when they were struck. An employee from Eagle Point Resort responded first after hearing dispatch on the radio. The girls were airlifted around 12:30 p.m. and initially taken to Beaver Valley Hospital and then to Primary Children's Hospital in Salt Lake City. As the pair were transported from Beaver, the younger girl was listed in critical condition and the older girl in serious but stable condition. The family reunion had people from Payson and Mapleton, Utah.
Wed, 07/26/2017 12:00 PM Killed Robert Byrd  16.0  Dothan AL 
 USA 
  on porch    Ground Strike,Outside,Porch,Tree 
DOTHAN, Ala. (AP)  An Alabama teenager who was struck by lightning at his home has died. The Dothan Eagle reports Houston County Coroner Robert Byrd says 16-year-old Aron Eugene Dunn had stepped out on the porch of his home Wednesday when lightning struck. Byrd says the lightning ran through a tree, and then jumped to the teen, going through his body and exiting his foot to the ground. Byrd says emergency responders worked on the teenager at the scene for 15 to 20 minutes before taking him to Southeast Alabama Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. Information from: The Dothan Eagle, http://www.dothaneagle.com (Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Share this:
Mon, 07/24/2017 12:00 PM Injured boy  11.0  Vestavia Hills AL 
 USA 
  fishing    fishing,Ground Strike,Near Water,Outside 
A young boy was taken to Children's of Alabama after he was possibly struck by lightning while fishing in Vestavia Hills. The incident happened about 1:30 p.m. on a small lake near Lambert Terrace in Liberty Park. Vestavia Hills Fire Capt. Ryan Farrell said the boy was about 10 or 12 years old. It appears lighting struck somewhere near him and he was showing signs of lightning-related injuries to his extremities. He was alert and talking at the scene, and is said to be in stable condition.
Sat, 07/22/2017 12:00 PM Injured kayaker  31.0  Ormond Beach FL 
 USA 
  standing in water    Boat,In Water,Outside,Salt Water 
ORMOND BEACH, Fla. (AP) - A 31-year-old kayaker has been struck by lightning and was rushed to the hospital. Flagler County Fire Chief Don Petito said the victim was standing in a shallow area of the Intracoastal Saturday night when a bolt of lightning struck nearby. She was injured by the electric shock. He said paramedics found her alert and conscious. Her name was not released. The Daytona Beach News-Journal reports she was taken to the hospital but her condition was not known. Information from: Daytona Beach (Fla.) News-Journal, http://www.news-journalonline.com Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
Sat, 07/22/2017 12:00 AM Injured Austin Dunn  21.0  Fort Myers FL 
 USA 
  near aircraft  N/A  Airplane,Indirect,Outside,Work 
FORT MYERS, Fla. A NavStar Aviation employee was reportedly injured after lightning struck a nearby airplane Saturday afternoon at the Southwest Florida International Airport, Lee County Port Authority spokeswoman Vicki Moreland said. The victim was injured at around 12 p.m. at the Southwest Florida International Airport on 11000 Terminal Access Rd, Moreland said. The lightning bolt struck a Sun Country aircraft and the shock hit the victim who was standing nearby, Moreland said. The victim was taken to Lee Memorial Hospital, Moreland said. No further information was immediately available.
Fri, 07/21/2017 08:00 AM Killed Toby Burrow  34.0  Lake Harding AL 
 USA 
  on a boat  N/A  Boat,Direct hit,On Water,Outside,Water 
By Kim Chatelain kchatelain@nola.com, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune A 34-year-old man died Friday night (July 21) after an apparent lightning strike to the head while boating on lake in Alabama, AL.com reported. The victim was on the vessel with four friends on Lake Harding in Lee County when a storm developed quickly. The boaters were trying to get to shore when the incident happened, the website reported. Medical personnel arrived and transported the victim to East Alabama Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead at 9:35 p.m. The victim was identified Saturday as Toby Burrow of Valley, Ala. Lake Harding is a 5,850-acre reservoir that straddles the Alabama/Georgia state line on the Chattahoochee River. LEE COUNTY, AL (WTVM) - Lee County Coroner Bill Harris confirms that a 34-year-old Toby Burrow died from a lightning strike to the head on Lake Harding in East Lee County. Lee County Deputies, EAMC EMS and Beulah Volunteer Fire and Rescue responded to an area on Lake Harding near Lee Road 793. Upon their arrival, they located 34-year-old Toby Burrow, of Valley, with no signs of life. Burrow was rushed to East Alabama Medical Center where he was pronounced dead on arrival at 9:35 PM CST from severe injuries from what appears to be a direct lightning strike. It is reported that Burrow and four other people were in a boat on Lake Harding when they were caught off guard by a storm and were attempting to get to land when the lightning struck Burrow and the boat. Two of the occupants of the boat had to swim the boat to land as the strike had disabled the vessel. The other two in the boat performed CPR on Burrow until they could reach land and meet with EMS. Two of the four survivors sought medical attention on their own and two did not seek medical aid. The accident remains under investigation by the Lee County Coroners Office and the Lee County Sheriffs Office. According to the National Weather Service website, Burrow is the eighth person in the United States to die from being struck by lightning in 2017. The other 7 deaths occurred one each in Colorado, Texas, North Carolina and four in Florida. Harris tells News Leader 9 in his 30 plus years in the coroner's office, he can't remember a lightning-related death. Copyright 2017 WTVM. All rights reserved. | For more news, download the WTVM app here.
Thu, 07/20/2017 12:00 PM Injured men on roof, 2 of 2  0.0  Jacksonville FL 
 USA 
  on a roof    On a Roof,Outside,Work 
Thu, 07/20/2017 12:00 PM Injured men on roof, 1 of 2  0.0  Jacksonville FL 
 USA 
  on a roof    On a Roof,Outside,Work 
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (WFLA/NBC)  Two men are in critical condition after being struck by lightning in Jacksonville on Thursday. The Jacksonville Fire Department said four people were on a roof when lightning struck one of them. Officials said one man was struck by lightning and knocked off the roof. Another man suffered burns from the strike. Both men were taken to a hospital where they remain in critical condition. A third man was taken to a hospital as a precaution. The fourth man was uninjured.
Wed, 07/19/2017 01:30 PM Injured man  34.0  Bass River NJ 
 USA 
  on a dock    Dock/Pier/Jetty,Ground Strike,Near Water,Outside 
A man survived getting struck by lightning at a Burlington County yacht facility Wednesday afternoon, authorities say. The 34-year-old was struck around 1:30 p.m. at the Viking Yachts facility on Route 9 in Bass River near the border of Burlington, Atlantic, and Ocean counties, according to the New Jersey State Police. The man, who was on a dock, was conscious and alert when emergency services units arrived, police said. He was transported to an area hospital in stable condition, according to authorities. Strong thunderstorms generating several cloud-to-ground lightning strikes were impacting the area at the time.
Tue, 07/18/2017 07:30 PM Killed David Everette  0.0  Sanford NC 
 USA 
  under a tree    Ground Strike,Outside,Tree 
SANFORD, N.C.  A man died after being struck by lightning Tuesday night in Sanford, according to a neighbor who witnessed the scene. The incident happened on Vance Street at about 7:30 p.m. as strong storms moved through the area. Neighbors said the storm was punctuated by a particularly loud lightning strike on a tree at the corner of Vance and Crestview streets. Neighbor Harmon Cochrane said he came outside to find authorities surrounding a person who was dead on the ground. Every now and then you would hear a little lightning but for one instance you heard two big booms and I just took for granted that the lightning hit something. I never thought it was going to be the individual, never did, he said. "That was a serious freak accident there, oh my God." Al Smith, a family friend and local pastor who spoke to WRAL News, identified the man who was killed as David Everette and said he was walking to the store as the heavy storm moved through. WRAL meteorologist Mike Maze said North Carolina is the third deadliest state in the country for lightning strikes, behind Florida and Texas. Maze said 198 people in the state have been killed by lightning between 1959 and 2016. Cochrane said he thinks the lightning victim may have gone under the tree to get away from the heavy rain. "Where that gentleman was, by a tree, that is not the place to be. You need to be in a building or a metal-top car," Maze said. Police have not commented on the incident or confirmed the identity of the person who was killed.
Tue, 07/18/2017 02:00 PM Injured 1 of 3  0.0  Sebastin TX 
 USA 
  working on fence    Indirect,Outside 
Sebastian, TX - Three people have been stuck by lightning in the town of Sebastian, Texas. Willacy County Sheriff Larry Spence and Willacy County Emergency Management Coordinator Frank Torres confirm the victims are two men and one woman. According to Torres, the trio were working on a fence in an alley in the downtown area near Farm-to-Market Road 506 when a bolt of lightning stuck a power pole Tuesday at around 2 PM. The lightning strike broke the pole causing the lines to fall on the fence, according to Torres. Four ambulances arrived on scene and transported the victims to Valley Baptist Medical Center in serious condition.
Tue, 07/18/2017 02:00 PM Injured 3 of 3  0.0  Sebastin TX 
 USA 
  working on fence    Indirect,Outside 
Tue, 07/18/2017 12:00 PM Injured Juan Garsa, 2 of 3  0.0  Sebastin TX 
 USA 
  working on fence  N/A  Indirect,Outside 
SEBASTIAN  All three victims of a lightning strike in Sebastian are recovering back at home. Juan Garsa and his cousin, Robert Cavazos, were helping to clear a field when lightning struck a pole. Both of them happened to be standing next to it at the time. Before they knew it, Garsa said they were knocked to the ground. "I felt rain, slight rain on my back. I felt cold water," Garsa said as he recalled what happened. Both said the feeling of being struck is still fresh on both their mind. "We just got a tingle of it, said Robert Cavazos. We just got a taste of what really happened," says Garsa. Garsa said what struck them as odd was the fact there wasn't any rain in the area while they were working. KRGVs Chief Meteorologist Tim Smith explained the unusual case. "This one was interesting because the thunderstorm was just beginning to build. It was the very beginning stage of this storm, he said. It started right over Sebastian and began to move away and as it began to move away that first lightning bolt formed." According to the National Weather Service, lightning kills an average of 47 people a year in the U.S. and injures hundreds more. Garsa and Cavazos were released from the hospital several hours later. They said they are lucky to be alive. "Hey man, thank God that Im alright. Thank God that my cousin is alright. Other than that, we could have lost our lives bro," he said. Both said they will be taking it easy for a while. A third person was also struck by the lighting. Garsa and Cavazos told CHANNEL 5 NEWS that person is at home resting.
Mon, 07/17/2017 12:00 PM Injured woman  0.0  Downey ID 
 USA 
  unknown     
A womans family reported that she had been struck by lightning during a thunderstorm in the Downey area on Monday evening, but authorities said they do not think that was the case. Emergency personnel responded to the incident in which it was reported the lightning hit the woman. After examining the woman, emergency personnel transported her via ambulance to Portneuf Medical Center in Pocatello. She is expected to survive. Bannock County Sheriff Lorin Nielsen said he doesnt believe the woman was struck by lightning. But the womans family contacted the Journal via Facebook and said she was hit by lightning. The woman reported experiencing headache symptoms, but Nielsen said that had the woman been struck by lightning she would have been seriously injured. The womans name has not yet been released by authorities. There were multiple thunderstorms barreling through Southeast Idaho on Monday and the National Weather Service warned about the frequent lightning associated with these storms.
Sun, 07/16/2017 12:42 AM Injured 4 of 4  0.0  Isle of Palms SC 
 USA 
  on beach    Beach,Ground Strike,Outside 
ISLE OF PALMS, SC (WCSC) - Authorities confirmed three adults and one child have been hospitalized Sunday afternoon after a lightning strike reported on the Isle of Palms. At 12:44 p.m. Isle of Palms Fire and EMS received a call about eight people being struck in Wild Dunes on Ocean Point Drive, according to Isle of Palms Fire Chief Ann Graham. Three adults, one of them pregnant, were struck and a child was injured when they were dropped by one of the adults holding them. Several others in the area were knocked off of their feet by the impact, Graham said. It is not clear whether any of the victims were actually hit by lightning and police say the injuries reported are non-life threatening. Isle of Palms Police and Fire, Charleston County EMS, a Charleston County Deputy, and Wild Dunes security all responded to the scene. This is a developing story. Check back for additional information. Copyright 2017 WCSC. All rights reserved.
Sun, 07/16/2017 12:42 AM Injured 3 of 4  0.0  Isle of Palms SC 
 USA 
  on beach    Beach,Ground Strike,Outside 
ISLE OF PALMS, SC Several people, including one holding a child, were struck by lightning at a South Carolina island resort Sunday, according to multiple reports. Eight people, including the child, were on the porch of their rental home when the lightning struck, according to The Associated Press. They were taken to an area hospital for treatment, according to Isle of Palms fire chief Ann Graham. None of the injuries were believed to be life-threatening, Graham told The Associated Press about the incident that occurred at a home on a golf course at the eastern edge of the barrier island. Graham said three adults had red streaks on their bodies afterward. The fire chief said the child was in the arms of one of the adults injured and was dropped, suffering a head injury. Charleston County Consolidated Dispatch said that multiple individuals  as many six individuals  were struck Sunday, according to postandcourier.com. It tweeted that five people were struck by Ocean Point. One person posted on Twitter that lifeguards were warning people to get out of the water, but many didnt listen. Read more here: http://www.struckbylightning.org/news/sbl20171807090052_article161663478.html.htm#storylink=cpy
Sun, 07/16/2017 12:42 AM Injured 2 of 4  0.0  Isle of Palms SC 
 USA 
  on beach  N/A  Beach,Ground Strike,Outside 
ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WNCN/AP)  Four people, including a child, were taken to a nearby hospital after a nearby lightning strike on the Isle of Palms on Sunday afternoon. Several other people who were close to the lightning bolt were knocked off of their feet by the strike, WCSC-TV, the CBS affiliate, reported. Isle of Palms Police, Isle of Palms Fire and Charleston County EMS all responded around 12:42 p.m. to Ocean Point Drive which is located in Wild Dunes. The Island Eye News, which covers Sullivans Island and the Isle of Palms, reported that three adults and a child who was being held by an adult were taken to a hospital after the incident. WCSC reported that several people were the porch of a home facing an inlet at the time of the incident. Three adults, one of them pregnant, were struck and a child was injured when they were dropped by one of the adults holding them, the CBS affiliate reported. The three adults who were taken to a hospital had red streaks on their bodies afterward. The child suffered a head injury after being dropped.
Sun, 07/16/2017 12:42 AM Injured 1 of 4  0.0  Isle of Palms SC 
 USA 
  on beach  N/A  Beach,Ground Strike,Outside 
ISLE OF PALMS ⬠The wedding guests were sitting down to brunch early Sunday afternoon when a lightning bolt struck a family ascending the nearby boardwalk. Seated outside a house that overlooks the inlet, the wedding guests had been watching the storm clouds and listening to the thunderclaps above before rushing to the boardwalk and helping the four strangers ⬠a man, two women and a toddler ⬠to their feet. One of the women had been carrying the toddler, said Fire Chief Ann Graham, and dropped the child when the lighting struck. In the moments that followed, Isle of Palms authorities were summoned to the residence, located in the Ocean Point neighborhood at Wild Dunes. While no one was seriously injured, chaos took hold of the afternoon. Matt Wille, who attended the brunch, said he watched from inside the house as groomsmen and other guests with medical backgrounds picked up the people from the ground and carried them off the beach and to safety. The rain-soaked groomsmen carried the four into the home, where they were given towels to dry off as well as new clothes, Wille said. On one of the manâ¬"s shoulders and on part of his back, Wille said, you could see where the lightning burned his skin. He had been carrying a beach umbrella when the lightning hit, Wille said. All the while, some wedding guests, who were also nurses, did their best to calm the other folks theyâ¬"d just carried off the beach. Chief Graham said Sunday that the four people were transported to an area hospital for injuries not believed to be life-threatening. Others who were walking with those struck were thrown off their feet by the strike and treated by emergency officials on scene. "However, (the four are) being evaluated further at the hospital," Graham said. Lightning strikes roughly 25 million times and kills about four-dozen people a year in the U.S., according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. So far in 2017, six people have died nationally as a result of lightning strikes, the agency said ⬠all were in open areas at the time. Two were struck at construction sites, two were killed outside their homes, one was killed while camping under a tree and one while horseback riding in an open field, also by a tree, according to statistics maintained by NOAA. Four of the incidents occurred in Florida, one in Texas and another in Colorado. Additionally, between 2006 and 2013, NOAA said, 64 percent of lightning deaths occurred while people were participating in leisure activities. "I think the smartest thing anyone can do when there's lightning is to seek shelter,⬝ Chief Graham said. Brooks Brunson contributed to this report. Reach Michael Majchrowicz at 843-937-5591. Follow him on Twitter @mjmajchrowicz.
Sat, 07/15/2017 12:00 PM Injured man  0.0  Grangerland TX 
 USA 
  outside    Outside 
GRANGERLAND, Texas - Lightning struck a man Saturday afternoon in the Grangerland area of Montgomery County. Firefighters with the Caney Creek Fire Department responded to an electrocution in the Country West subdivision. They found a man in his home who told first responders he was outside when he was struck. The man went to the hospital to be checked out and is expected to be OK. © 2017 KHOU-TV
Fri, 07/14/2017 05:30 PM Injured woman on golf course  0.0  Drayton ND 
 USA 
      Golf Course,Ground Strike,Outside 
DRAYTON, N.D.  The family of a golfer struck by lightning is keeping a close watch on her as she recovers. The 51-year-old Canadian woman was injured after being struck by lightning at the Drayton golf course around 5:30 p.m. on Friday, July 14. Emergency responders were called to the scene and said the strike was indirect and traveled through her golf club. Family members said the Manitoba woman was in town for a family get together. Her family says the sky above was clear, but some clouds were off in the distance. "All of a sudden a dark cloud from the Northwest kind of came over there. And then we heard this big boom. Somebody said she had rubber on the bottom of her shoes and that may have saved her life," said Sheila Halcrow, Drayton golfer. The family says she's still in very serious condition at Altru in Grand Forks and her her husband is with her.
Fri, 07/14/2017 05:30 PM Injured woman on golf course  0.0  Drayton ND 
 USA 
  playing golf    Golf Course,Ground Strike,Outside 
DRAYTON, N.D.  The family of a golfer struck by lightning is keeping a close watch on her as she recovers. The 51-year-old Canadian woman was injured after being struck by lightning at the Drayton golf course around 5:30 p.m. on Friday, July 14. Emergency responders were called to the scene and said the strike was indirect and traveled through her golf club. Family members said the Manitoba woman was in town for a family get together. Her family says the sky above was clear, but some clouds were off in the distance. "All of a sudden a dark cloud from the Northwest kind of came over there. And then we heard this big boom. Somebody said she had rubber on the bottom of her shoes and that may have saved her life," said Sheila Halcrow, Drayton golfer. The family says she's still in very serious condition at Altru in Grand Forks and her her husband is with her.
Thu, 07/13/2017 Injured person  61.0  Columbus OH 
 USA 
  walking    Ground Strike,Outside,Walking,Work 
http://abc6onyourside.com/news/local/osu-employee-struck-by-lightning COLUMBUS, Ohio (WSYX/WTTE) ⬠A part-time employee at the Woody Hayes Center was struck by lightning, witnesses confirmed. Officials say a 61-year-old part time worker "Red Coat" with OSU working the Goodwill Special Skills Invitational event was hospitalized. They said she was walking to her car to seek shelter during the storm. People working nearby said her umbrella was struck by lightning. Volunteer Mary Mielke said she heard that one of the workers got hit by lightning. She said it was a good reminder to stay alert during storms. Jonathan Whitesell was using survey equipment when the incident occurred. He said he is cautious around lightning, and worries about getting hit. OSU has yet to release the name of the worker.
Thu, 07/13/2017 12:00 PM Injured woman  0.0  Eastabuchie MS 
 USA 
  on porch    Indirect,Outside,Porch 
EASTABUCHIE, MS (WDAM) - A woman was indirectly struck by lightning Wednesday in Eastabuchie. According to Forrest County Emergency Management Director Glen Moore, the woman was on her porch across the street from a water tower at the time of the incident. The water tower piping took a direct hit from the strike, but she was indirectly struck due to her close proximity, according to Moore. The woman was transported to an area hospital as a precaution. There is a boil water notice in effect for the surrounding area while Barringtown Water Association continues with repairs to the water tower. Copyright WDAM 2017. All rights reserved.
Thu, 07/13/2017 unknown unknown  61.0  Columbus OH 
 USA 
      Ground Strike,Outside,Walking,Work 
http://abc6onyourside.com/news/local/osu-employee-struck-by-lightning COLUMBUS, Ohio (WSYX/WTTE) ⬠A part-time employee at the Woody Hayes Center was struck by lightning, witnesses confirmed. Officials say a 61-year-old part time worker "Red Coat" with OSU working the Goodwill Special Skills Invitational event was hospitalized. They said she was walking to her car to seek shelter during the storm. People working nearby said her umbrella was struck by lightning. Volunteer Mary Mielke said she heard that one of the workers got hit by lightning. She said it was a good reminder to stay alert during storms. Jonathan Whitesell was using survey equipment when the incident occurred. He said he is cautious around lightning, and worries about getting hit. OSU has yet to release the name of the worker.
Thu, 07/13/2017 12:00 PM Injured man  0.0  North Stonington CT 
 UA 
  touching metal rail    Festival,Indirect,Metal Railing,Outside 
A man was likely struck by lightning in North Stonington on Thursday afternoon. The victim was standing in a cattle barn and leaning on a metal separator at the North Stonington Fairgrounds when there was a huge crack of thunder, according to the fire marshal, George Brennan. The man collapsed and was knocked unconscious. He gained consciousness relatively quickly, Brennan said. The electrical system in the cattle barn was not damaged and it appears the man was struck by lightning, Brennan said. Roger Federer Captures 8th Wimbledon Title Emergency crews took the man to Westerly Hospital in Rhode Island to be treated. The extent of his injuries were not known, according to Brennan. The North Stonington Agricultural Fair was canceled Thursday night due to the weather forecast. Brennan said the cancellation of the fair was not due to the lightning incident, but was rather due to the conditions of the fairgrounds after the rain. It will resume on Friday. Source: Person Struck by Lightning in North Stonington | NBC Connecticut http://www.struckbylightning.org/news/sbl20171707092645_Person-Reportedly-Struck-by-Lightning-in-North-Stonington-434338023.html.htm#ixzz4n5y2Q74h Follow us: @nbcconnecticut on Twitter | NBCConnecticut on Facebook
Thu, 07/13/2017 11:30 AM Injured person  61.0  Columbus OH 
 USA 
  walking    Ground Strike,Outside,Walking 
http://abc6onyourside.com/news/local/osu-employee-struck-by-lightning COLUMBUS, Ohio (WSYX/WTTE) ⬠A part-time employee at the Woody Hayes Center was struck by lightning, witnesses confirmed. Officials say a 61-year-old part time worker "Red Coat" with OSU working the Goodwill Special Skills Invitational event was hospitalized. They said she was walking to her car to seek shelter during the storm. People working nearby said her umbrella was struck by lightning. Volunteer Mary Mielke said she heard that one of the workers got hit by lightning. She said it was a good reminder to stay alert during storms. Jonathan Whitesell was using survey equipment when the incident occurred. He said he is cautious around lightning, and worries about getting hit. OSU has yet to release the name of the worker. COLUMBUS (WCMH)  Firefighters say a woman was transported to the hospital after being struck by lightning on Ohio State Universitys campus on Thursday. At about 11:30am, Thursday, a man called 911 saying his wife had been struck by lightning in the 200 block of Fred Taylor Drive, while they were walking in a parking lot near the Woody Hayes Athletic Center. The man told dispatchers the woman was struck in the right arm and hand. Firefighters say the woman was alert and talking prior to being transported. The woman was taken to Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, but her condition is unknown at this time. Dan Hedman with the OSU Director of Marketing and Communications says the woman is a part-time employee who was working an event outside the Hayes Center. She was on her way back to shelter when an incident occurred, he said.
Thu, 07/13/2017 12:00 AM Injured James Church  55.0  Ponce Inlet FL 
 USA 
  fishing    fishing,Ground Strike,Outside 
James Church at fishing jetty where he was struck by lightning earlier this year, at Lighthouse Point Park in Ponce Inlet, Fla., July 13, 2017. Florida leads the nation in lightning strikes, a danger many here fail to appreciate: Church was fishing and though he was safe because he could not hear thunder from the storm on the horizon. [Scott McIntyre | The New York Times] PONCE INLET  It was a drizzly, dark January morning, but James Church grabbed his fishing pole and tackle box anyway, hopped in his Jeep and headed for the jetty, eager to get in some fishing as an antidote to a hard week of work. Wearing his brown rubber waders and a yellow rain jacket to keep out the 6 a.m. cold, Church, 55, cast back his pole and let loose the line and sinker. He saw lightning on the horizon far away and felt safe. Then a bolt struck. He remembers a deafening boom and a flash so bright he felt his eyes burn. He woke up against a metal railing 6 feet away. Lying on his back, alone, in the dark, his body felt paralyzed. He knew he had to reach his cellphone to get help, but it was locked in the tackle box. "My will to survive kicked in," Church said. "I needed to get moving instead of just lying there." Electric Hotbed In a state that counts alligators, sharks and hurricanes among its many dangers, add lightning. Florida has more lightning than any other state in the country (20.8 strikes per square mile) and the most people who die from lightning (54 since 2007 — more than double that of the next state, Texas), according to the National Weather Service. This year, four people have died from lightning — two construction workers, a camper and the baby of a pregnant mother who was seriously harmed by a bolt; many more have been injured. Lightning's fondness for Florida stems from its location, climate (hot and humid) and topography: A peninsula, it stretches between two warm bodies of water, the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. This produces hot, wet air — a sea breeze — that rises over land. "We have the best place in the country for thunderstorms," said Martin A. Uman, a distinguished professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Florida and the author of "The Art and Science of Lightning Protection." "It takes rising, hot, moist air to make thunderstorms." Unlike other states, Florida has all-season thunderstorms, which peak during summer. And it has an outsize number of year-round boaters, beachgoers, fishing enthusiasts and golfers — human lightning rods in wide, flat, open spaces. Lightning likes to strike the tallest thing around. Sometimes it's a tree. Sometimes it's a human. While the odds of being hit are extremely low, lightning is unpredictable. It can lurk far from where you think danger lives. Floridians are trained to listen for thunder. The savvier among us know to count the seconds between seeing lightning and hearing a rumble (for every five seconds, the lightning is 1 mile away). But lightning defies those expectations. It can strike 10 miles away from a cloud. A Lucky Strike Church said he couldn't hear any thunder from the jetty. It was drizzling. And yet he got hit — hard. As he lay on his back in the dark on Jan. 7, Church, a martial arts teacher, tried to move but couldn't — a common reaction to lightning. It short-circuits your body. After a time, he flipped himself onto his stomach but couldn't get up. He felt a surge of liquid pour out of his belly. Blood. Then he slowly crawled to his tackle box and tried to open it. That's when he noticed two of his fingers — the right ring finger and pinkie — were almost entirely gone. He used his thumbs to snap it open, grabbed his phone and called 911. "I just got hit by lightning," he told the 911 operator. "I lost two fingers. They are completely gone," he added later between moans. "Everything is starting to hurt a little bit now." [Scott Mcintyre for The New York Times] Church lost two of his fingers in the lightning strike. The incident has changed him in some ways, he said: "I just pay attention to life more." Church was lucky: the lightning missed his heart. Most people hit by lightning die because their hearts stop. But it still left lasting damage. The lightning hit his fishing pole and exploded the metal sinker toward his face. Because he was resting the pole near his right hip, the force of the lightning shoved it into his stomach. His elbow had been against his hip so the current traveled there and along his forearm. It left his body through his two fingers. He spent nine hours in surgery. Doctors cut open his stomach and took out half of his small and large intestines, which had been burned and damaged. Then they sewed up his fingers. His stomach, arm and wrist still have burn marks. His rain jacket was shredded. His eardrums had burst. Six months later, he said he made it a point to enjoy life just a little more, even though, with no insurance, he is still paying his medical bills, and storms can easily spook him. He takes weekends off, and hangs with his grandchildren. "I just pay attention to life more," he said. Scars Inside and Out For Falk Weltzien, the worst almost happened. His heart stopped for several minutes. Weltzien was about to kiteboard on Vilano Beach, next to St. Augustine, with his 14-year-old son the afternoon of Oct. 1, 2012. There were no black clouds or thunder; it was overcast. Luckily, a nurse was walking down the beach and started performing CPR. Weltzien, 39 at the time, was foaming at the mouth and turning purple. In the hospital, tests were run and burns treated that ran across the back of his neck and left forearm. The worst pain came a short while later, he said. His back felt as if it were burning. "It was the nerves healing," he said, a nerve condition called neuropathy. "It lasted 30 days and it was excruciating pain. Painkillers didn't help. It was nonstop, the worst." [Mauricio Lima for The New York Times] Falk Weltzien at a skate park near his home in Jundiaí, Brazil. He was struck by lightning in 2012 on a Florida beach, but he continues to kiteboard and play golf regularly. His left arm still has nerve damage and his eardrums were damaged, something he discovered getting on a plane shortly after the incident. The ear pressure was almost unbearable, he said. He also noticed he felt winded when he kiteboarded or surfed. After running tests and X-rays, doctors noticed something about his left lung. "One half is completely black," he said. "I only have half a lung working there." Dr. Mary Ann Cooper, a professor emerita at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and an expert on lightning injuries, said lightning can cause a wide range of damage, from tingling and numbness to cardiac arrest and lasting brain injury. About two-thirds of people lose consciousness, she said. Fewer than half suffer marks on their skin. And most are hurt by electricity as the current travels through the ground. The Weather Service estimates only 10 percent of those hit by lightning die. It's not a club anyone wants to join, but survivors often crave one another's company. This gave rise to Lightning Strike & Electric Shock Survivors International, which has members from around the United States and in 13 countries. The most common injury is a concussionlike brain injury, Cooper said. She added that memory problems, nerve damage and chronic pain were also typical and could last a lifetime. That's what happened to Cameron Poimboeuf, a Charlotte, North Carolina, resident, who was struck last July near Clearwater. Cameron, then 15, was playing Pokemon Go with a friend. As they ran for shelter from an approaching storm, he was hit and his heart stopped. Cassandra Thomas, a pediatric nurse standing on a balcony, saw it happen and raced down nine flights of stairs and across the beach to reach him. She did CPR for about 20 minutes, with the help of an off-duty officer. Predictions were dire: Cameron would not recover or his brain would be seriously damaged. But he lived and largely recovered. "It's hard not to see God in that," his mother, Karen Poimboeuf, said. Cameron still suffers from invisible wounds, post-traumatic stress disorder, nerve pain, mood swings, sleeplessness and anxiety. His friend also was hit and suffered short-term leg immobility because of the shock to the nerves, but is fine. For Weltzien, any lingering pain is pushed aside. He still kiteboards regularly and plays golf. "I'm not really scared," he said. "I believe things happen for a reason." A Weatherman's Report [Maddie McGarvey for The New York Times] Brad Sussman was a meteorologist in Florida when a bolt of lightning struck him at home in the early 1990s. He now sells insurance in Ohio. Brad Sussman's lightning bolt was forged in irony. "I knew everything about lightning," he said. That's because he was chief meteorologist at a Jacksonville station and sat on the county's lightning safety board back then, in the early 1990s. One afternoon, rain was pounding his house and Sussman saw an open window on the screened porch. He walked over to the metal window frame and put his right hand on it. Next thing he knew, he was flat on his back 18 feet away. "My 2 1/2-year-old son says, ‘Daddy, that was funny. Do that again,'" said Sussman, who now sells insurance in Cleveland. Sussman was speechless; he literally couldn't talk. A neighbor heard the boom and walked into the house. "How could I be struck by lightning?" Sussman told him. "I'm a meteorologist." The evidence was on the porch roof: a burned hole. The lightning had traveled across to the window frame. Sussman walked away with only a small burn on his right shoulder blade, a loopy feeling for a couple of hours and more respect for lightning. "When lightning strikes nearby," he said, "wow, do I get scared." __ Stay Safe Out There From 2006 through 2016, 352 people in the United States were killed by lightning strikes, and many more were seriously injured. What should you do when a thunderstorm is in the air? Here are tips from the National Weather Service. Are you inside? Lightning can sneak up on you through plumbing and wires. Don't wash hands, dishes or take a shower. Don't use your computer. Stay away from windows, doors and porches. Are you outside? Thunder means lightning is close by, even if it sounds far away. Take shelter immediately in a sturdy building. No building nearby? Get inside a car (but not a convertible). Keep the windows up and don't touch the ignition, radio or steering wheel. On a boat? Go inside the cabin. No cabin? Lie low. You never want to be the tallest object. Wait 30 minutes until the last rumble to go outside. Lightning can strike 10 miles from a storm. Are you camping? A man in Florida died this month when a lightning storm broke out while he was camping. Avoid open fields and the tops of hills or ridges. Stay away from tall, isolated trees. Are you swimming? If you are in the water, get out. Avoid contact with metal. Metal and water do not attract lightning, but they are conductors of electricity. Are you playing golf? Most courses in Florida have sirens to alert players that a lightning storm is on the way. Holding a club aloft in a storm is particularly unwise. But in fact, more people have been killed while playing soccer than while playing golf. Are you at work? Farmhands and ranch workers have been the most frequent victims of deadly lightning: Of those who died from 2007 to 2016, 31 percent held those jobs. Roofers also face high risk. Are you in Seattle? After Florida, Texas has the most deaths from lightning, followed by Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas and Oklahoma. Washington state residents are the least likely to die from a lightning strike. Are you a gambler? You have a 1-in-13,500 chance of being struck during your lifetime, and a 1-in-1,083,000 chance of being hit in a single year. Hit by Lightning: Tales From Survivors 07/19/17 [Last modified: Wednesday, July 19, 2017 1:55pm] Photo reprints | Article reprints Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, New York Times. 12 12
Tue, 07/11/2017 12:00 PM Killed Corporal Skyler James, 1 of 2  0.0  Air Station New River NC 
 USA 
  working on plane    Airplane,Delayed Death,Ground Strike,Military,Outside 
JACKSONVILLE, N.C. (WNCT)  A Marine stationed aboard Marine Corps Air Station New River died after being struck by lightning while working on an MV-22 Osprey aircraft on July 11, according to the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing. Corporal Skyler James, a tiltrotor mechanic assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 261, Marine Aircraft Group 26, and another Marine were struck by lightning while working on the aircraft. Following the incident, they were transported to Camp Lejeune Naval Hospital where they were evaluated for serious injuries. The other Marine was released, while James was subsequently transported to UNC Health Center for further treatment. Following several days of treatment and evaluation, James was declared dead. Marines were exiting the flight line at the time of the incident as a lightning within 5 miles notification had been declared just prior, according to a news release from the United States Marine Corps. As part of standard operating procedure at 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, squadrons receive regular weather updates for their area of operation, and are required to remove personnel from flight line activity when lightning is within 5 miles or presents a significant risk, the release said. Cpl. Skyler James was a hardworking Marine full of work ethic, ability, and drive, said Lt. Col. Stephen Pirrotta, commanding officer of VMM-261. He was quick to smile and ready to accept any maintenance challenge on the flight line with a demeanor that allowed for easy interaction between his peers and superiors, alike. This was a tragic accident. Corporal James will be sorely missed by the Raging Bulls. His family is in our thoughts and prayers. James, of Sonoma, California, joined the Marine Corps in March 2014 and was promoted to corporal in Oct 2016. His awards include the Marine Corps Good Conduct medal; Sea Service Deployment ribbon; Global War on Terrorism Service medal; and National Defense Service medal.

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